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August 7th, 2014

Security_Aug05_CSecurity of your systems and technology is always an on-going battle and one you will likely never completely win. There are definitive steps you can take to ensure that your systems are secure, but we find that one of the most effective tools is knowledge. If you know a bit about how your systems can be breached, you can ensure a higher level of caution and security. To help, here are five common ways businesses see their systems breached.

1. You are tricked into installing malicious software

One of the most common ways a system's security is breached is through malware being downloaded by the user. In almost every case where malware is installed the reason is because the user was tricked into downloading it.

A common trick used by hackers is to plant malware in software and then place this software on a website. When a user visits the site, they are informed that they need to download the software in order for the site to load properly. Once downloaded, the malware infects the system. Other hackers send emails out with a file attached, where only the file contains malware.

There are a nearly limitless number of ways you can be tricked into downloading and installing malware. Luckily, there are steps you can take to avoid this:

  • Never download files from an untrusted location - If you are looking at a website that is asking you to download something, make sure it's from a company you know about and trust. If you are unsure, it's best to avoid downloading and installing the software.
  • Always look at the name of the file before downloading - Many pieces of malware are often disguised with file names that are similar to other files, with only a slight spelling mistake or some weird wording. If you are unsure about the file then don't download it. Instead, contact us as we may be able to help verify the authenticity or provide a similar app.
  • Stay away from torrents, sites with adult content, and movie streaming sites - These sites often contain malware, so it is best to avoid them altogether.
  • Always scan a file before installing it - If you do download files, be sure to get your virus scanner to scan these before you open the apps. Most scanners are equipped do this, normally by right-clicking on the file and selecting Scan with….

2. Hackers are able to alter the operating system settings

Many users are logged into their computers as admins. Being an administrator allows you to change any and all settings, install programs, and manage other accounts.

If a hacker manages to access your computer and you are set up as the admin, they will have full access to your computer. This means they could install other malicious software, change settings or even completely hijack the machine. The biggest worry about this however, is if a hacker gets access to a computer that is used to manage the overall network. Should this happen, they could gain control over all the systems on the network and do what they please on it.

In order to avoid this, you should ensure that if a user doesn't need to install files or change settings on the computer, they do not have administrator access. Beyond this, installing security software like anti-virus scanners and keeping them up to date, as well as conducting regular scans, will help reduce the chances of being infected, or seeing infections spread.

3. Someone physically accesses your computer

It really feels like almost every security threat these days is digital or is trying to infect your systems and network from the outside. However, there are many times when malware is introduced into systems, or data is stolen, because someone has physically had access to your systems.

For example, you leave your computer on when you go for lunch and someone walks up to it, plugs in a USB drive with malware on it and physically infects your system. Or, it could be they access your system and manually reset the password, thereby locking you out and giving them access.

What we are trying to say here is that not all infections or breaches arrive via the Internet. What we recommend is to ensure that you password protect your computer - you need to enter a password in order to access it. You should also be sure that when you are away from your computer it is either turned off, or you are logged off.

Beyond that, it is a good idea to disable drives like CD/DVD and connections like USB if you don't use them. This will limit the chances that someone will be able to use a CD or USB drive to infect your computer.

4. It's someone from within the company

We have seen a number of infections and security breaches that were carried out by a disgruntled employee. It could be that they delete essential data, or remove it from the system completely. Some have even gone so far as to introduce highly destructive malware.

While it would be great to say that every business has the best employees, there is always a chance a breach can be carried out by an employee. The most effective way to prevent this, aside from ensuring your employees are happy, is to limit access to systems.

Take a look at what your employees have access to. For example, you may find that people in marketing have access to finance files or even admin panels. The truth is, your employees don't need access to everything, so take steps to limit access to necessary systems. Combine this with the suggestions above - limiting admin access and installing scanners - and you can likely limit or even prevent employee initiated breaches.

5. Your password is compromised

Your password is the main way you can verify and access your accounts and systems. The issue is, many people have weak passwords. There has been a steady increase in the number of services that have been breached with user account data being stolen. If a hacker was to get a hold of say your username, and you have a weak password, it could only be a matter of time before they have access to your account.

If this happens, your account is compromised. Combine this with the fact that many people use the same password for multiple accounts, and you could see a massive breach leading to data being stolen, or worse - your identity.

It is therefore a good idea to use a separate password for each account you have. Also, make sure that the passwords used are strong and as different as possible from each other. One tool that could help ensure this is a password manager which generates a different password for each account.

If you are looking to learn more about ensuring your systems are secure, contact us today to learn about how our services can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
August 6th, 2014

BCP_Aug05_CRegardless of the industry you operate in, or the size of your business, you should be taking steps to ensure that your business is ready for any disaster. While there are many paths you can take to ensure your business is ready, there is one element that is central to all plans: backing up your data. In the first part of this article, we took a look at four points that will help improve the effectiveness of your backups. Here are another four.

5. Automate your backup

It can be tough to actually remember to back up your files, especially if your business is busy. Therefore, you could look into an automated backup solution. At the very least, you should set a schedule as to when backups are conducted and set what is being backed up. While this isn't a full automation, a schedule will help.

If you are using solutions like the cloud or NAS (Network Attached Storage), you can usually automate the process by selecting which files and folders to back up and when. The software that powers these solutions will then do this automatically.

Ideally, your backups should be carried out automatically to ensure your data is available should you need it. But you should check periodically to ensure that your data is actually being backed up. This is especially true if you are backing up other systems, as there have been cases where employees have become frustrated by the backup process and simply turned it off. The business owner, thinking their data was being backed up would be in for a bit of a shock when systems crashed, if this was the case.

6. Back up your backups

Redundancy of your backups is just as important as actually backing up your data. You should keep a backup of your backup in case something happens to your original backup. While this doesn't have to be carried out as often as the 'normal' backup, this should be done on a regular basis.

In order to really ensure backup redundancy we recommend that if your main backup is kept on-site, then the secondary backup should be on another storage medium that is kept off-site.

7. Don't forget data stored on non-physical drives

What we are referring to here is the data stored on different services like your email, social media, and non-physical locations. This is especially true if you say have you own servers. It's highly likely that there is data stored on these services as well, and should they go down and you haven't kept a backup, you may lose important information.

Essentially, think about critical data that is used in the company, but isn't physically kept on computers. It may feel like this is going a step too far with backups, especially for businesses who use email services like Exchange and Gmail. However, while the chances of these systems going down are incredibly rare, it could still happen. Therefore, you should conduct a monthly to bi-yearly backup just to ensure that data is there somewhere should something happen.

8. Test your backups

Finally, it is beneficial to actually test your backups from time-to-time to ensure that they are not only working but the data is actually recoverable. If you do a trial run on recovering your data, you can get a good idea of how long it will take to retrieve this information when you actually need to recover it. You can then take steps to optimize this and let the relevant people know.

Also, testing is a good way to discover any problems, e.g., if someone has disabled backups, or one solution isn't working. This will ensure that your data is there when you need it.

If you are looking to integrate a data backup solution, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 5th, 2014

HealthIT_Aug05_AAs we move toward the October 2015 compliance deadline for ICD-10, the Journal of AHIMA has tackled three misconceptions about the new coding system.

ICD-9 isn't so bad. In reality, ICD-9 is obsolete, and the longer it is in use, the more the quality of health-care data will decline, leading to faulty decisions based on inaccurate or imprecise data. This could lead to increased operating costs along with mistakes which could have a negative effect on your practice and overall billings.

More codes create confusion and difficulty. Almost half of the new codes reflect the ability to differentiate one side of a patient's body from the other. Moreover, more codes, which are more precise, will in fact make it easier to find the right code. It's true that it will take time to learn the new codes, but in the long-run you should see overall efficiency increase, along with more accurate medical records which will make your job easier.

We could just use SNOMED CT or move right to ICD-11. Terminologies such as SNOMED and classification systems such as ICD-10 different roles—albeit complementary ones. And, ICD-11 won’t be ready for prime time until 2017, and that dates marks the beginning, not the end, of the process toward adoption. Remember, ICD-10 was first used by World Health Organization members 1994—and 10 year’s later it’s just going live on a widespread basis.

If you would like to learn more about ICD-10 and how you can ensure that your practice is ready for the October 2015 deadline, contact us today to learn how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 30th, 2014

SocialMedia_July28_CA common use of LinkedIn is the curation and sharing of content with fellow colleagues and users. The business oriented social platform has a wide variety of features that encourage users to share content, and earlier this year its own content creation platform was implemented for select users. Now, the company has rolled out the new publishing platform for all users to take advantage of.

About LinkedIn's new publishing platform

Like other social networks, LinkedIn allows users to publish posts on their profile which are then visible to other users. In the past, there was a limit as to how long the posts could be, which influenced how users shared the content they generated. Most would simply copy and paste a link to their content into a post on their LinkedIn profile.

In an effort to make sharing thoughts, ideas, expertise, etc. easier, LinkedIn has implemented the long-form post. This feature allows you to create longer content, such as blog articles and opinion pieces, and post this directly on LinkedIn. In other words, you can now use LinkedIn as a blog which is shared with your connections.

If you create long-form content, this could be a useful way to get posts out to an even wider audience than through your blog. This is because when you publish a post on LinkedIn, it becomes part of your overall profile, with the post being visible under the Posts section of your profile. New long-form posts will also be published and shared with all of your contacts automatically.

This means that you could technically increase the overall reach of your content, especially if the content you produce is useful to your LinkedIn connections.

Writing long-form content on LinkedIn

If you would like to start publishing long-form content using your LinkedIn profile, you should be able to do so by:
  1. Logging into your LinkedIn profile.
  2. Pressing the pencil in the box that says Share an update…
Note: This update is still rolling out to users, so you may not be able to produce long-form content just yet. If you don't see the pencil in the Share an update… box, you will need to wait for a few weeks, or until you get an email from LinkedIn saying the feature is ready for you to use.

If you do see the pencil icon, click on it to open the long-form post screen. It looks like most other Web-based publishing and writing platforms with the usual formatting buttons and text field where you input the content.

You can write your article directly on this page, but many choose to write using a program they are comfortable with and then copy and paste into the text field. If you want to add images to your post, you can simply click where you would like the image to slot into the content and select the camera icon from the menu bar above the text field. Select the image and hit Submit. You can then resize the image by clicking and dragging on it.

Saving and editing your content

Once you have finished writing we strongly recommend you hit the Save button at the bottom of the text field. This will save the content to your profile, but will not post it. This means you can edit the content before publishing. To do this, click on Preview which will open your post in another window, allowing you to see what the post will look like on your profile.

While in Preview mode, be sure to check the spelling and grammar, along with the overall formatting. If you spot anything that needs to be changed simply switch back to the editing tab on your browser and make any amendments.

When you have finished writing, formatting, and editing you can then hit the Publish button. This will then publish the content on your profile and share it with your connections.

If you have content that you think your connections and colleagues would benefit from reading, then this new LinkedIn feature could prove to be useful and should be considered as a larger part of your overall content strategy.

Looking to learn more about LinkedIn and how you can leverage it in your business? Contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
July 29th, 2014

Office365_July28_CYammer has become an increasingly popular Web app among businesses today. With integration and updates from Office 365, Yammer allows organizations to enhance workflow and productivity through seamless communication. To that end, Office 365 has introduced its latest Yammer-based update, simplifying the login process for Yammer. Let’s take a look at what Yammer really is and see how this simplified login works.

What is Yammer?

Yammer is Microsoft’s social network platform, focusing on your business and your organization’s clientele. In order to join, you must have a working email address from your company’s domain, which will also enable you to create external networks to allow non-employees like suppliers and customers to communicate with your company effectively and easily.

What is simplified login and how do I turn it on?

Simplified login integrates Yammer and Office 365 through user mapping to save you time when signing into Yammer via Office 365. Here’s how to turn on the simplified login feature:
  1. Administrators must sign into Office 365 using the global administrator account.
  2. Select Admin, Sharepoint; and once in Sharepoint admin center, select Settings.
  3. On the Settings page, under Enterprise Social Collaboration, select Use Yammer.com service.
  4. Click on Yammer from Office 365 to check that you won’t have to log in again and can start connecting with people right away.
If you previously made Yammer the primary social experience for your organization, you can enable this for your Office 365 users by following these steps:
  1. Access Sharepoint admin center and select Settings.
  2. Under Enterprise Social Collaboration, click the Use Sharepoint Newsfeed button to clear previous settings
  3. Select Use Yammer.com service and click Ok to apply changes. Each of these two updates might take up to 30 minutes to complete
  4. Once you’re done, Yammer will replace Newsfeed in the Office 365 navigation.
Keep in mind that users without existing Yammer accounts are taken to a streamlined signup and verification process. And although user mapping saves time, it’s not a complete single sign-on solution, meaning when you go to Yammer.com directly or use Yammer mobile apps, you still need to log in with your Yammer.com credentials. Looking to learn more about Office 365 and its functions? Call us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 23rd, 2014

BCP_July21_CBacking up your data is an essential business task that should not be ignored. Believe it or not, it's not a matter of if your systems will crash putting your data at risk, but when. There's a good chance that you could face data loss if systems crash, and backing up your data will reduce this loss. In case you are struggling with backing up your data, we have come up with eight tips that can help.

1. Pick the backup solution that works best for your business

When it comes to backing up the data on your company's computers and systems, most companies consider five main options:
  • Internal hard drives - You can either use another hard drive installed in your computer or partition an existing hard drive so that it functions as a separate drive on which you back your data up. This is a quick option, however should your computer or the hard drive fail - two of the most common computer failures - then you will lose this data.
  • External hard drives - These drives are essentially separate hard drives that you connect to your computer via a USB or other connection. Many of these drives allow for one touch backup and can be configured to back up data at certain times. While these can be useful, especially if you want to keep data backups easily accessible, they are prone to the same potential failure as internal drives.
  • Removable drives or media - For example, USB flash drives, DVDs, etc. These are great for backing up work you are doing at the moment or for transferring small files from one machine to another. These options are limited by smaller storage sizes however, so backing up even one computer will likely require multiple disks or drives.
  • Cloud-based backup - This is the act of backing up your files to a backup provider over the Internet. Your files are stored off-site and can be restored as long as you have an Internet connection. For many businesses, this has become the main form of backup employed, largely due to cost and convenience - files can be backed up in the background. The biggest downside of this backup option however is that you do need an Internet connection for it to work and you will see more bandwidth being used, which could result in slower overall Internet speeds when files are being backed up.
  • NAS - Network Attached Storage, is a physical device that has slots for multiple hard drives. You connect this to your network and the storage space on the hard drives is pooled together and delivered to users. This solution is like a mix of cloud-based and external backup, only the device is usually in your office. While it is a good backup solution, it can get expensive, especially if you have a large number of systems to back up.
There are a wide variety of backup solutions available, so it is a good idea to sit down and figure out which are best for your business. The vast majority of companies integrate multiple solutions in order to maximize the effectiveness of their backups and spread the risk of losing data around a bit.

2. Split your backup locations

Despite all of the backup options available, you can narrow these down to two categories, the fact that the backups are kept in two locations:
  • On-site - Data backup solutions that are kept in your office. This could include internal hard drives, or NAS, and more. The idea here is that the data backup is kept in your office. Some like USB drives may leave the office, but the main idea is that they are used primarily in the office.
  • Off-site - Data backup solutions are stored off-site, or out of the office. The best example of this is cloud-based backup where your data is stored in a data center, most likely in another city. Another example is backing up to hard drives and storing them in a secure location outside of the office.
In order to ensure that your data backups are available should you need them you could split up the locations where they are kept. Should you keep all of your backups on hard drives in the office and there is damage to the premises, you could see your data disappear. One of the most effective strategies is to have one set of backups on-site, and another off-site which will ensure that should there be a disaster in one location, the other will likely be safe and you will still be able to access your data.

3. Establish a standard naming and filing system

Have you ever seen how people organize their hard drives? Some like to use folders and subfolders that are organized neatly, while others tend to throw files into one general folder. The same can be said for they way files are named - there's just so many differences.

Because of these differences, it can be difficult to back up and recover files properly. We recommend that you pick a naming and file system that every file and folder will follow across all systems. This means backups will be quicker, you will be able to see what is new, and you will spend less time organizing files.

Beyond this, an efficient naming and organization structure goes a long way toward making it easier to find files and recover them should your systems go down.

4. Determine which files need to be preserved

While it may be tempting to back every file and folder up, in an effort to maximize efficiency of your solution, it is better to not back everything up. We aren't saying don't back anything up, but you should take time to identify what files and folders are to be backed up. For example, screenshots that have been uploaded to the Web may not need to be kept.

The same can be said for non-work related files. While these may be important to your personal life, they likely aren't to the business so should not be backed up onto your business backups.

Look at each file and folder and see if it has something to do with business decisions, or is in anyway tied to your business. If it is then it is probably a good idea to keep it.

Stay tuned for the next four tips coming soon. If you would like to learn more about data backups in the mean time however, please contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 22nd, 2014

Facebook_July21_CFacebook's reach has been steadily increasing over the past half decade. Nothing makes this more evident than the fact that you can use your Facebook username and password to log into different apps and sites. While this is convenient, many apps request private information, something users are often uncomfortable with. In order to increase overall account privacy, Facebook has introduced two new account login features.

Anonymous login

What is interesting about apps on Facebook is the way people use them. For the most part, they add an app because their friends are talking about it and they want to check it out too. Most of the time however, we don't really stick with apps and instead quickly move onto another app. The problem with this is that all of these apps are asking for access to at least some information on your profile.

Most people who want to try an app usually would rather not have to share their profile information for privacy reasons. In an effort to increase account privacy, Facebook has announced the anonymous login feature. This will let you log into different apps using your Facebook username and password without sharing your personal information.

For example, if you want to use your Facebook account to access Flipboard you can login anonymously and link your account to Flipboard, but your personal information like name, email address, contact number, etc. will not be shared. This feature will also make it so the app cannot post on your News Feed. In other words, say goodbye to those annoying game invites!

This feature has been released on Facebook's side, but the company is still working with app developers to get the feature integrated into their apps. Over the next year or so we should see more and more apps integrate this great privacy feature.

Line by line control for Facebook login

An increasing number of apps are allowing users to log in using their Facebook account and password. Think of any app or even some sites you have recently used, or visited, and chances are you've seen the 'Log in with Facebook' button. Pressing this will link your Facebook account to the app, and then bring up a window asking you to allow the app to access certain information on your Facebook profile.

This information can include your username, email, friend list, birthday, Likes, etc. It also often includes another option to allow the app to post to Facebook on your behalf. While app developers certainly have the right to ask for this information, some users feel that apps often ask for too much private information. So, in an effort to tighten up privacy, the company has updated their Facebook app login. Now, when you go to log into an app using your Facebook account you can select what information is shared.

Click Log in with Facebook on many apps and you should see the usual permission window open, only now you should see a link that says 'Edit the info you provide'. Clicking this will bring up a list of permissions the app is requesting.

You will see check marks beside each line of permission. Many of these are actually optional, and you can now uncheck them to prevent that specific information from being shared. Also, by default, apps will no longer be able to post to Facebook on your behalf. You will need to approve this when you first connect to the app.

These two features are a great boost to account privacy. If you are looking to learn more about using them effectively contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 18th, 2014

Virtualization_July14_CVirtualization, often defined as the act of moving physical systems to a digital environment, has become one of the most sought after tech improvements, especially for small to medium businesses. While virtualization is popular, it is still complex and has many potentially confusing terms associated with it. To help, we have created a short glossary of 10 popular virtualization terms.

1. Virtual Machine (VM)

You will often hear virtualization experts bandy about the term VM. What they are talking about when they say this is the Virtual Machine. The VM is essentially a virtual representation of the computer on your desk. It can do everything a physical machine does, only everything is virtual and usually delivered over a network connection.

Because VMs are software based, you can often run more than one VM on the same physical machine. This could equate to having say two separate versions of Windows running at the same time, or even running a different operating system, say Windows on your MacBook.

2. Virtual server

A specific type of VM, in this case a server, that is running in a virtual environment. A common setup many offices employ is to have one physical server on premise. This server then hosts separate virtual servers that in turn host different services like email, networking, storage, etc.

Other businesses choose to rely completely on virtual servers. This is where another company hosts the servers which are delivered to you over the Internet. To the computers and users it appears the servers are there on your network, and can be interacted with normally when in truth, the servers are actually virtual.

3. Virtual desktop

Much like the virtual server, the virtual desktop is a specific type of VM. In this case, it is a virtually delivered version of an operating system like Windows, Linux or even OS X.

Since the advent of virtual desktops, the idea that companies have to stick with one type of operating system has started to become irrelevant. For example, if you own a Mac and need to access a Windows only program, one solution is to use a virtual version of Windows. If you have access to one, you will be able to run Windows from your Mac without having to physically install it on your computer.

4. Hypervisor

The hypervisor is essentially a small operating system that enables virtualization. Its job is to take physical hardware resources and combine them into a platform that is then delivered virtually to one, or many different users.

5. Host system

The host system, also referred to as the parent, is where the physical hardware and software is installed. These physical components are then copied by the hypervisor and delivered in a virtual state to the user. If you are creating a virtual desktop environment, then the host system will have the desktop's OS installed on it, along with the necessary software.

6. Guest system

The guest system, also referred to as the child, is where the VM is accessed. To carry the example on from above, the OS that is installed on the host machine is replicated by the hypervisor and the copy is then delivered to the user.

The user can interact with the OS just as they would with the physical host machine, because the guest system is an exact copy of the host. The only difference is, the guest machine is virtual instead of physical.

7. Virtual Infrastructure

When you combine a bunch of different types of VMs together into one solution, including hardware, storage, desktops, and servers you create a virtual infrastructure.

This can then be deployed to businesses who are looking for a completely virtualized solution. The easiest way to think of this is that your whole IT infrastructure is combined into one solution and virtualized. Many companies look for a solution like this because it reduces the need for on-premise hardware, while making it easier for an IT partner to manage.

8. P2V

P2V, or Physical to Virtual, is a term used by IT experts to refer to the act of migrating a physical system to a virtual one. The most common example of P2V is the merging of physical servers into a virtual environment that is hosted on one server.

9. Snapshot

A snapshot is an image of the state of the virtual machine at a specific point of time. This includes all of the data, configurations, and even windows or programs open at that time. Snapshots are used kind of like the Save button on video games - it saves your progress. When you next load up the VM, you will get all of your data, programs, and configurations back.

Snapshots are also kept in case something goes wrong with the VM. You can easily revert back to an older snapshot, one that was taken before the problem.

10. Clone

The action of taking one VM and creating an exact copy that can then be used by another computer or user.

If you are looking to learn more about virtualization, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 17th, 2014

BCP_July14_CMetrics are used in nearly every business process, including disaster preparedness and any business continuity plan (BCP) you might have at the ready. Businesses who are looking to ensure that their company will make it through any disaster successfully need to have an effective BCP with metrics like RTO and RPO in place.

While both RTO and RPO are important elements of continuity plans, and they both sound fairly similar, they are actually quite different. In this article we define RTO and RPO and take a look at what the difference is between the two concepts.

RTO defined

RTO, or Recovery Time Objective, is the target time you set for the recovery of your IT and business activities after a disaster has struck. The goal here is to calculate how quickly you need to recover, which can then dictate the type or preparations you need to implement and the overall budget you should assign to business continuity.

If, for example, you find that your RTO is five hours, meaning your business can survive with systems down for this amount of time, then you will need to ensure a high level of preparation and a higher budget to ensure that systems can be recovered quickly. On the other hand, if the RTO is two weeks, then you can probably budget less and invest in less advanced solutions.

RPO defined

RPO, or Recovery Point Objective, is focused on data and your company's loss tolerance in relation to your data. RPO is determined by looking at the time between data backups and the amount of data that could be lost in between backups.

As part of business continuity planning, you need to figure out how long you can afford to operate without that data before the business suffers. A good example of setting an RPO is to imaging that you are writing an important, yet lengthy, report. Think to yourself that eventually your computer will crash and the content written after your last save will be lost. How much time can you tolerate having to try to recover, or rewrite that missing content?

That time becomes your RPO, and should become the indicator of how often you back your data up, or in this case save your work. If you find that your business can survive three to four days in between backups, then the RPO would be three days (the shortest time between backups).

What's the main difference between RTO and RPO?

The major difference between these two metrics is their purpose. The RTO is usually large scale, and looks at your whole business and systems involved. RPO focuses just on data and your company's overall resilience to the loss of it.

While they may be different, you should consider both metrics when looking to develop an effective BCP. If you are looking to improve or even set your RTO and RPO, contact us today to see how our business continuity systems and solutions can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 16th, 2014

AndroidTablet_July14_COne of the biggest business trends is the idea of going mobile. With the heavy adoption of devices like Android tablets, business owners are able to connect with the office from nearly anywhere. This is great news and one of the mains reasons why so many businesses are thinking about adopting Android tablets at work. For those who are, here is a brief guide on some dos and don'ts for Android in the office.

Do:

  • Use separate profiles - Tablets that use newer versions of Android (4.3 and newer) have a unique feature that is incredibly useful for business users: You can set up more than one account on the device. This means you can have a personal account and a work account on the same device without the two crossing over. Each account has their own apps and layout, which makes it perfect for the BYOD crowd.
  • Pick responsibly - Android tablets come in all shapes and sizes, and with different versions of the operating system. It is therefore a good idea to do some research before you buy one for your business. Take the time to try and identify what you will be using the device for, what features you would like, and most importantly, if the device is compatible with your existing systems. We strongly recommend going with one of the big name brands like Samsung, LG or Acer, or the Nexus line.
  • Develop a usage and management plan - Before you implement the device into your office, be sure to develop a plan on how the device is to be used and managed. Will each employee be in charge of managing their own device, or will your IT partner manage them for you? Be sure to also develop a list of approved apps, including important ones like email and messaging; and that users are familiar with how to use them.
  • Look into accessories - One common factor many businesses forget to look into when implementing Android devices is the numerous accessories available for tablets. In order to extend the life of the devices it is a good idea to get protective cases and screen covers. Also, look and see if the device you have chosen has a removable battery or SD card. If it does, you may want to invest in extra batteries and cards.

Don't

  • Skimp on security - As Android tablets become more popular, the devices are seeing an increase in malicious attacks. It would therefore a good idea to implement mandatory security measures on all devices. This includes an antivirus scanner and daily check for app updates. Also be sure to educate the staff who will be using the device on common security issues, such as how to spot fake apps, use an antivirus scanner, and how to enable secure browsing on the Web.
  • Allow third party app stores - Because of the openness of Android, you can install apps from almost any location. This has resulted in many third-party app stores (stores not run by Google) popping up. Some of these stores host any kind of app, including ones that contain malware. So, it is a good idea to just outright ban these stores; only allowing apps from Google Play to be installed on devices.
  • Force the tablet on users - Some employees won't want a tablet, preferring instead to stick with their laptop or desktop. Don't force your employees to adopt the device if you know they won't use it. This will just lead to you wasting your tech budget and to unused devices.
  • Worry about fragmentation - Yes, Android is very fragmented - devices are running different versions of Android. While this may seem like a big deal, it doesn't have to be. We recommend that when selecting tablets, pick a newer version of Android and purchase tablets using the same version. Once you get used to the tablet, the issue of fragmentation will usually disappear, especially if everyone is on the same version.
If you are looking for help selecting and managing an Android device for your office, contact us today to learn about how our services can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.